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#13010878 Jan 23, 2017 at 11:04 AM
3 Posts
Given the existence of both the ESRB and CARA systems, I don't find the Common Sense Media Ratings to be filling a particularly large hole in the industry. I also don't appreciate the implication that other rating systems are biased or paid for. The break down by age and what is recommend is interesting but it feels like they draw a lot from somewhat flimsy science.

I do really enjoy the breakdown in ratings though. I think its a useful metric to both warn students and parents about upcoming curriculum material in a way that may help them avoid triggering issues. I know in universities more and more teachers are putting forward trigger warnings to cover similar problems.
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#13014405 Jan 24, 2017 at 07:25 PM · Edited 4 months ago
4 Posts
Common Sense Media appears to be exactly what its name implies. Too often people don't use common sense when choosing media and that is where problems arise. I do like how the website categorizes the content by age and points out specific information from each category in case something is missed when previewing the content. I can use this resource to double check the media so that there are no inappropriate surprises. Like others have mentioned, these are guidelines and not the law so teachers should use discretion based on their students.
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#13019221 Jan 26, 2017 at 06:29 PM
3 Posts
I thought it was interesting that these ratings are more nuanced than the traditional TV/movie ratings we're used to. They take much more than just sexual content, violence, and language into account. I liked the 'consumerism' category. It's something that I try to make my kids more aware of, so I'm glad to see it reflected in these ratings.

These ratings alter my thinking in that it makes me more aware of additional aspects of media that we may just ignore as adults.
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#13019336 Jan 26, 2017 at 07:33 PM
4 Posts
I thought it made sense. I liked that it viewed sex and violence as about the same, namely that they require some explanation. I work in a relatively conservative district, and am pretty careful about showing anything sexual in nature, but am more than willing to show gore. I show the beginning of Saving Private Ryan in US History, and have yet to have anyone say anything about it. To be fair, I set it up quite a bit and it has some historical significance, and it's probably a bad idea. Either way, I thought it was a good guide that also did a good job of explaining what's going on in a kids head, and explaining why they could or couldn't handle various types of media.
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#13024069 Jan 29, 2017 at 02:28 AM
4 Posts
I've referred to common sense many times as a parent. Initially just to check out a game or video that my son is interested in. But I now find it a useful source of ideas, especially for books. I'm generally comfortable with the site's idea of what content is appropriate for different levels of development. And my son is - for the moment anyway - way more of a prude about any hint of romance in a movie than common sense is.

I hadn't poked around in the eductor side of the site before. Since it's focused on K-12, there isn't much that is relevant to me, so I can't say this will impact what I develop.
My friends call me 'Smeldy'
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#13029898 Jan 31, 2017 at 10:32 AM · Edited 4 months ago
2 Posts
Common Sense Media was an imperative resource for me last year while I was teaching technology to K-5th students. I referenced it often for lesson planning, actually used several digital citizenship lessons with my students, referred other classroom teachers to the site and used it to choose resources to create technology-based projects. As a parent, I have also used the site to research and discover appropriate media, such as educational apps for my young children. I think it's great that the site also provides developmental guidelines for every age level as well. I also very much appreciate the Special Needs content available.
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#13030201 Jan 31, 2017 at 12:41 PM
1 Post
I think that the guidelines are a good starting place for deciding on content. I was already very familiar with the guidelines and use them frequently. It was good to review.
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#13038004 Feb 03, 2017 at 12:48 PM
4 Posts
I tend to agree with Common Sense's Age Appropriate Guidelines. I've used them many times to help influence my curricular decisions, or at least to get a point of view from parents and other teachers. As an Instructional Tech Coach and a Technology teacher, I'm usually always looking for things that are age, content, and curriculum appropriate.
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#13042507 Feb 05, 2017 at 12:20 PM
3 Posts
I agree with the Common Sense Media Ratings system. It is a useful guide for teachers and has been especially useful for me since I taught film for many years. I think there are certain situations where you may need some flexibility (for me, this is usually with foreign films), but for the most part they are spot on.
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#13053065 Feb 09, 2017 at 10:55 AM
5 Posts
I mostly agree with the organizations statements. I have a 17 year old son who loves to point out the rediculous nature of the movie and game ratings. I do think Common Sense does a much better job.
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#13074598 Feb 18, 2017 at 02:28 PM · Edited 3 months ago
2 Posts
I agree with commonsense media that "media profoundly affects our kids' social, emotional, and physical development". As educators it is our job to ensure that the content we use in our classroom is age appropriate. I agree with Commonsense that parents hold the end job in determine what is appropriate, so as teachers we should not try and "push the envelope". The information on their website gives me some guidelines to follow as I select media for my students. For example, if looking to show a film to a class, I can use their age appropriate guidelines to determine what films are appropriate.
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#13076456 Feb 19, 2017 at 02:28 PM
4 Posts
I agree with the Common Sense approach to rating materials. I have found, over my years of teaching, that even with ratings it is still important to preview materials to make sure that there are no “surprises” when you are showing things to your students. I find that I am a bit more conservative that the students tend to be in High School… they sometimes suggest things to me, things they have watched, that I would not use in class.
Cheers,
Be
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#13084097 Feb 22, 2017 at 04:25 PM
2 Posts
I generally agree with the Common Sense Rating system. It seems consistent and I appreciate that it uses up-to date research to back up its guidelines for each age group.
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#13163326 Mar 31, 2017 at 06:13 AM
4 Posts
I appreciate someone else reviewing a game before I buy it. It's nice to know what I am getting into. I do not want to waste time on something that might be inappropriate for my students. There is plenty out there to choose from.
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#13185732 Apr 11, 2017 at 08:00 AM
4 Posts
I tend to agree with most of these guidelines. One thing that was interesting that I did not think about for teens was explaining and protecting them from giving out their personal information. This seems like more of an issue than ever.
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#13189306 Apr 13, 2017 at 06:43 AM
2 Posts
I agree with the guidelines. My kids come from a semi-rough neighborhood, so they have probably seen and heard worse than what is recommended for their age, but with the common sense system, they will be able to see what is actually appropriate for them. This guide will be a lot of help, because our district guidelines only say that a video has to be PG or lower in order to show in class (PG-13 with parental permission). This site will help to understand the rating and determine if it's appropriate for my students.
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#13191479 Apr 14, 2017 at 10:47 AM
1 Post
I do agree with the common sense media recommendations. Many of my students commonly see PG13 content and sometimes I think we think something might be PG, but really it is PG13 because what students discuss about movies they are watching, tv shows, etc are not PG, especially at the middle school level.
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#13192924 Apr 15, 2017 at 10:43 AM
2 Posts
I agree with the Common Sense media ratings and guidelines. Although no system is infallible, I think that this a solid attempt at communicating what content is underage viewers will or may be exposed to. As I explored the website, I began thinking about not only the content I will directly share with my students, but what other links and websites their search quests may lead to. Reviewing and exploring something like Common Sense ratings, made me more cognizant of what I need to do to ensure a positive learning experience for all of my students.
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#13215201 Apr 27, 2017 at 06:46 PM · Edited 20 days ago
2 Posts
I agree with the guidelines and found it quite interesting reading the info regarding my students ages but more so my own children!!

It is very important to think about students developmental levels when planning, we are striving to maximise their learning which simply can't happen if the content we are using is too scary or they are unable to relate for example. School is hard enough, why make it more difficult simply due to lazy task prep.

The guidelines were easy to understand and really highlighted what most of us already 'know' or 'feel' about our students so it was good to see it explained further. I also agree with the comments of others that they are 'guidelines' and our personal knowledge of our own students and situations plays a very important role also.

I may refer back to the guidelines in the future as I particularly found the section regarding choosing appropriate media quite helpful. It provided lists (apps for example) with guideline ratings and also teacher ratings which is useful food for thought.
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#13271519 May 29, 2017 at 08:08 AM
4 Posts
I agree with the Common Sense Media ratings and guidelines. As a high school teacher for thirteen years and a parent of a high school senior as well as a toddler, the description of cognitive development was accurate. This information guides the rating and guidelines system. For the 15-17 year-old group, which is whom I primarily teach, the information about teen motivation and desire for independence is key. I liked how CSM stressed asking questions, providing positive models, and discussing. When teens feel like they are being undervalued and treated like "children" they often shut down or rebel, so by using these strategies it will help guide teens in the right direction if they access mature content on the web.

One way that these guidelines have changed my way of thinking is that I will try to be more understanding when my toddler wants to watch the same show or read the same book for the upteen-thousandth time.
As always,
Trillianbean
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