Notify Message
Forums
Page 1
Search
#8493806 Sep 25, 2013 at 12:10 PM · Edited over 4 years ago
Guild Officers
75 Posts
Discussion based on October 2 Hangout

Link for Google Hangout Recording


WoW in Business Hangout by Center4EduPunx, on Flickr

To sign up for the event please go to here on the calendar.

If you want to be one of the participants on the Google Hangout, please make sure you you must have joined the Game Economies Google + community and been approved.https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/113521696357302172511 (Please do this at least one hour before the event).
+0
#8527550 Oct 03, 2013 at 08:12 AM
Guild Officers
164 Posts
I am still not able to get into Area 52:(
+0
#8529197 Oct 03, 2013 at 02:23 PM
Guild Officers
75 Posts
Well you know what that means.......you get to join Inevitable Betrayal's bank guild on Sisters of Elune

Puny Gods

as far as provenance of Puny Gods

Well of course there's the scene in the Avengers....

and the guild's ranks are named after the dialogue that Xin the Weaponmaster
has with you as the final boss of Mogu-Shan Palace. ( Yes we're dancing on his throne after beating him).


v42 by Center4EduPunx, on Flickr

small

weak

puny

are all mentioned quite a bit.

That probably why we have all of our leveling parties there.


Level 90 Party outside of Mogu'shan Palace by Center4EduPunx, on Flickr
+0
#8532197 Oct 04, 2013 at 08:02 AM
20 Posts
Ok. THAT was a very successful sell! I think i want to do this on Puny Gods instead of Arbitrage. I made a Death Night on Area 52. We'll see how much time i have until tomorrow's meeting.
Looking forward!
Dr Benjamin Balak
Associate Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Rollins College, Winter Park FL
+0
#8532798 Oct 04, 2013 at 10:24 AM
Guild Officers
75 Posts
At tomorrow session, we'll do a comparison of the realms so people can pick which one they want or both.
+0
#8534094 Oct 04, 2013 at 04:10 PM
20 Posts
Screen shot of my new Goblin Death Knight on Area 52 trading at the Orgrimar auction house (using auctioneer addon)
Intro to WoW in Business quest notes:

Notes for Google+ hangout discussion (2013-10-03)

  • Introduce myself:
Associate Prof of Economics at Rollins College, FL
PhD from UNC-Chapel Hill, 2001
Gamer since Star Trek on IBM 360 mainframe in 1975
WoW with my kids since 2006
Using Civilization to teach economics since 2004, used WoW sporadically in class too

  • In the discussion, it was briefly mentioned that the WoW economy a “free” non-regulated market.
I would like to unpack this a little along lines I use when teaching economics with CIV:
> Define free market (complicated question for moral philosophers like Adam Smith)
> True that there’s no price regulation but it’s not like the real-world economies:
(1) Rules are strictly enforced (automatically by code)

(2) Radically meritocratic society:

  • Equal opportunity
  • Inheritance (i.e. starting with some kind of advantage) NOT allowed and only possible via illegal black-market real world trade (RWT)
  • > Players overwhelmingly view purchased characters and/or gold as unfair in-world yet it’s perfectly acceptable in the real world to most. > This is an interesting economic-ethics tension that can be explored.
So it’s an ideal theoretical market-system: great way to teach the potential & shortcoming much like in Adam Smith’s writing!

  • A good example of how games can help foster high-level discussions (from a Bloom’s Taxonomy pedagogical perspective) even at a early stage of education!


ALSO: The rhetoric about the concept of “virtual goods” reminds me of the rhetoric about financial tools (i.e. not goods or gold/silver) in the burgeoning capitalism in 17th century Europe.
* I can recommend a bunch of books and articles but also Neal Stephenson’s The Baroque Cycle (a brilliant historical romance about the long 17th century and the birth of modernity)
Dr Benjamin Balak
Associate Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Rollins College, Winter Park FL
+0
#8542192 Oct 06, 2013 at 06:48 PM
Guild Officers
22 Posts
Ah the Baroque Cycle. One of my favorite series. I really liked their storyline about the counterfeiting of the coins.

You pose an interesting idea about inheritance being illegal. However, there is some inheritance like aspect to having a high level character passing down wealth and assets to their lower level bank alt. There are also many instances of Guilds providing gold and other assets to new guildies to help them get on their feet.

#8534094 DearBalak wrote:

Screen shot of my new Goblin Death Knight on Area 52 trading at the Orgrimar auction house (using auctioneer addon)
Intro to WoW in Business quest notes:

Notes for Google+ hangout discussion (2013-10-03)

  • Introduce myself:
Associate Prof of Economics at Rollins College, FL
PhD from UNC-Chapel Hill, 2001
Gamer since Star Trek on IBM 360 mainframe in 1975
WoW with my kids since 2006
Using Civilization to teach economics since 2004, used WoW sporadically in class too

  • In the discussion, it was briefly mentioned that the WoW economy a “free” non-regulated market.
I would like to unpack this a little along lines I use when teaching economics with CIV:
> Define free market (complicated question for moral philosophers like Adam Smith)
> True that there’s no price regulation but it’s not like the real-world economies:
(1) Rules are strictly enforced (automatically by code)

(2) Radically meritocratic society:

  • Equal opportunity
  • Inheritance (i.e. starting with some kind of advantage) NOT allowed and only possible via illegal black-market real world trade (RWT)
  • > Players overwhelmingly view purchased characters and/or gold as unfair in-world yet it’s perfectly acceptable in the real world to most. > This is an interesting economic-ethics tension that can be explored.
So it’s an ideal theoretical market-system: great way to teach the potential & shortcoming much like in Adam Smith’s writing!

  • A good example of how games can help foster high-level discussions (from a Bloom’s Taxonomy pedagogical perspective) even at a early stage of education!


ALSO: The rhetoric about the concept of “virtual goods” reminds me of the rhetoric about financial tools (i.e. not goods or gold/silver) in the burgeoning capitalism in 17th century Europe.
* I can recommend a bunch of books and articles but also Neal Stephenson’s The Baroque Cycle (a brilliant historical romance about the long 17th century and the birth of modernity)
+1
#8734030 Nov 19, 2013 at 11:59 AM
20 Posts
It's my dream to teach an econ history interdisciplinary seminar based on the Baroque Cycle... one day
You're absolutely correct about how there are definitely ways to benefit from social connections in WoW even if direct inheritance is banned. I think there is plenty of economics to do about these issues. It is after all a large-scale behavioral laboratory.

#8542192 Abacus wrote:

Ah the Baroque Cycle. One of my favorite series. I really liked their storyline about the counterfeiting of the coins.

You pose an interesting idea about inheritance being illegal. However, there is some inheritance like aspect to having a high level character passing down wealth and assets to their lower level bank alt. There are also many instances of Guilds providing gold and other assets to new guildies to help them get on their feet.

#8534094 DearBalak wrote:

Screen shot of my new Goblin Death Knight on Area 52 trading at the Orgrimar auction house (using auctioneer addon)
Intro to WoW in Business quest notes:

Notes for Google+ hangout discussion (2013-10-03)

  • Introduce myself:
Associate Prof of Economics at Rollins College, FL
PhD from UNC-Chapel Hill, 2001
Gamer since Star Trek on IBM 360 mainframe in 1975
WoW with my kids since 2006
Using Civilization to teach economics since 2004, used WoW sporadically in class too

  • In the discussion, it was briefly mentioned that the WoW economy a “free” non-regulated market.
I would like to unpack this a little along lines I use when teaching economics with CIV:
> Define free market (complicated question for moral philosophers like Adam Smith)
> True that there’s no price regulation but it’s not like the real-world economies:
(1) Rules are strictly enforced (automatically by code)

(2) Radically meritocratic society:

  • Equal opportunity
  • Inheritance (i.e. starting with some kind of advantage) NOT allowed and only possible via illegal black-market real world trade (RWT)
  • > Players overwhelmingly view purchased characters and/or gold as unfair in-world yet it’s perfectly acceptable in the real world to most. > This is an interesting economic-ethics tension that can be explored.
So it’s an ideal theoretical market-system: great way to teach the potential & shortcoming much like in Adam Smith’s writing!

  • A good example of how games can help foster high-level discussions (from a Bloom’s Taxonomy pedagogical perspective) even at a early stage of education!


ALSO: The rhetoric about the concept of “virtual goods” reminds me of the rhetoric about financial tools (i.e. not goods or gold/silver) in the burgeoning capitalism in 17th century Europe.
* I can recommend a bunch of books and articles but also Neal Stephenson’s The Baroque Cycle (a brilliant historical romance about the long 17th century and the birth of modernity)
Dr Benjamin Balak
Associate Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Rollins College, Winter Park FL
+0
Page 1