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Have you use some form of open content in your teaching before?

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#10028622 Sep 16, 2014 at 01:47 PM
1 Post
Hi, I'm rigaral. While I do see the importance of Open Educational Resources, I am slightly annoyed at the use of the term itself. Instead of using any number of other, more commonly used terms, the continued batter about of "OER" smacks of the academia's needs to invent new labels for things people already use to make themselves feel important. Lots of resources already exist for uses that could include educational through Creative Commons licenses. Yet we now have some additional term, OER, that is supposed to be what? "Just for educational" or "just for the classroom"?

If learning can happen anywhere, then all open resources are educational. What use is there in naming it something different or otherwise limiting its usage to those we deem to be "in education" or not?
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#10029409 Sep 16, 2014 at 04:58 PM
3 Posts
I have used OER materials in my composition and literature courses for several years with greater use in the past 3. This semester, I am teaching 3 classes with textbook free through the use of OER materials. My students are mixed in their comfort with OER materials, as they are accustomed to using a paper-based textbook. They seem to be more engaged with the material that I present in class, however, as they already know that their text is in the form of notes or selected textbook pages...maybe this is a psychological response.
I want to use OER materials in all of my classes eventually.
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#10039348 Sep 18, 2014 at 09:00 PM
9 Posts
Hey, I'm Heather! I am a graduate student in English Literature. I'm not yet a teacher, but I'm interested in OERs so that I have plenty of tools for when I do get a position teaching. This is my first time accessing the 3D GameLab and learning the term "OER," so there is plenty for me to learn!
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#10050204 Sep 21, 2014 at 03:02 PM
1 Post
Hello, my name is Sarah Camp and I am in the tail end of my Master's degree program in English Literature. I am interested in OER's and open content for the sheer purpose of saving money and having a wide variety of "texts" to offer not only to my students, but share with my colleagues, friends, and save for my own utilization. As this is my first semester teaching, I decided to use a lot of open context texts instead of having my students spend upwards of $250.00 on recommended course text books. Not only has my experience in doing this been well received by the students, but I have also found a myriad of texts on the web that have proven useful to my own research endeavors as well as my colleagues. Allowing the use of open content resources in my classroom has allowed my students to find what works best for them as far as getting them to learn the information. What I hope to learn from this group is how to appropriately and intelligently pick OER's and open content resources. I am especially interesting in utilizing web comics and informational comics within my class room.
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#10055155 Sep 22, 2014 at 05:02 PM · Edited 7 years ago
7 Posts
My name is Shantal Figueroa and I am a Master's student at Old Dominion University. I am interested in OER's as a way to deliver contents to students in a more customizable and acessible way. I would like to learn examples and applications of OERs. So far, I do not have any experience with OERs.
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#10058541 Sep 23, 2014 at 11:36 AM
9 Posts
My name is Kim Fahle. I am a PhD student at ODU. I am interested in OERs as a way to provide access to useful content to students that doesn't cost an arm and leg (like text books). I'm also hoping that through this content I can engage students in new ways and help them be multiliterate individuals. My only experience (I think) with OERs in the open textbook project Writing Spaces. I am excited to learn about many more resources to utilize.
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#10071250 Sep 26, 2014 at 05:47 AM · Edited 7 years ago
2 Posts
My name is Kelly Cutchin and I'm a PhD student at ODU. I have only recently been venturing into the world of OERs (read: poking around MERLOT), primarily because I don't feel that the textbooks required by my institution do much to engage students or have them produce anything other than black-squiggles-on-white-paper texts. Like Kim, I would like to do what I can to help students develop multiliterate skills and, at the very least, show them that digital work is valuable and incredibly useful. I am excited to learn more about how OERs function and how students and instructors alike navigate these simultaneously open and full/saturated spaces.
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#10071849 Sep 26, 2014 at 08:35 AM · Edited 7 years ago
3 Posts
Hi, my name is Cynthia Davis and I am in the MFA program at ODU. I am interested in OERs as a vehicle to enhance instruction in the freshman and sophomore level classes I teach, but think that I might be able to use it even more with my remedial English students to make the material more engaging.
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#10072424 Sep 26, 2014 at 11:02 AM
6 Posts
Greetings to all! I've been teaching composition at various schools for 15+ years, and was introduced to OER at my current position at a 4-year liberal arts institution. The primary resource I've been using is the Open Source teaching resources WritingSpaces and WritingCommons as readers for my freshman writers. The fact that students can access these materials -- written by scholars and practitioners in my field -- for no cost is a plus (especially since textbooks run around $100 for a book from which we might only assign 1/3 of the materials).

My experience with the above OERs has been largely positive. These sites are flexible, in that I can assign one article or web page/exercise or ten, and I can pick these without being constrained by the texts themselves. With textbooks purchased through a university bookstore, I may not have any control over what readings or activities are offered. However, there seems to be a bit more instructor agency possible with these open sources -- and I've found they're more fun to read!

I'm looking forward to discovering more OER resources, as well as how to constructively employ them in my teaching. Availability and cost are certainly considerations, but is there more to be considered?
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#10074844 Sep 27, 2014 at 12:23 AM
3 Posts
#10055155 sfigu wrote:

My name is Shantal Figueroa and I am a Master's student at Old Dominion University. I am interested in OER's as a way to deliver contents to students in a more customizable and acessible way. I would like to learn examples and applications of OERs. So far, I do not have any experience with OERs.



Hey Shantal,
OER materials are great as long as you have the time to search for materials. There are many organizations that are invested in archiving OER courses and materials, and Lumen is an example organization you may want to check out.
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#10083929 Sep 29, 2014 at 10:19 AM
1 Post
Hi all,

My name is Mike Piero, and I'm an Assistant Professor of English at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, OH. I'm very interested in open content, as I have just this year converted my English 1020 College Composition II course to an open content format with no traditional textbook. We use electronic sources, my own material, and (starting soon) learning objects collaboratively created by myself along with our campus instructional designer and instructional technologist. Keep that last part on the down-low though, because that sort of collaborative work still ruffles some feathers of people on campus :)

The main open comp/rhet book I use is called Rhetoric and Composition and is available here. I use the Purdue OWL for MLA resources, so there is a lot of information literacy learning that happens as a very happy side effect of this switch from traditional textbooks. It did take a lot of time to create and organize this material, but it saves students time and money and allows for more engaging, dynamic content, I think.

Mike
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#10090482 Sep 30, 2014 at 05:44 PM
1 Post
Hi everyone,

My name is Summer and I am a second year English PhD at Old Dominion University. I am interested in open content, especially in regards to Creative Commons, in order to better fulfill the requirements that come with my assistantship for Media Commons. Before this semester, I was not really familiar with Creative Commons and fair use for images, so learning to navigate the rights associated with different types of images.
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