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#9625028 Jun 11, 2014 at 06:45 PM
Guild Officers
74 Posts
http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p47tZLJbdag&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s

- This could be used as a quick review at the end of the unit for high school students.
- It could also be used to activate prior knowledge prior to jumping into teaching the American revolution.







"The Quakers, the Dutch, and the Ladies: Crash Course US History #4." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 11 June 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p47tZLJbdag&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s>.
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#9625065 Jun 11, 2014 at 06:59 PM · Edited over 6 years ago
Guild Officers
74 Posts


- You can use this as part of a unit on measurement and fractions
- Students could take this recipe and have to rewrite it for 3 times the amount

The Recipe Club. "Halloween Recipe Sampler from The Recipe Club." Scribd. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 June 2014. <http://www.scribd.com/doc/70137440/Halloween-Recipe-Sampler-from-The-Recipe-Club>.
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#10065008 Sep 24, 2014 at 07:40 PM
9 Posts
WRITTEN/ALPHABETIC TEXT

link to (or better yet, embed) the resource you found: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22072/22072-h/22072-h.htm

list the learning objective of the lesson the resource supports:
Understand how mythology and folklore contribute to cultural identity
Consider how mythology and folklore contribute to the body of literature
Explain how mythology and folklore reflect the spiritual, interpersonal and world view of a culture

provide some form of attribution/citation of the resources:
Anonymous. "Folk-lore and Legends: North American Indian." Project Gutenberg. W. W. Gibbings. 2007. EPUB. Downloaded September 24, 2014. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22072/22072-h/22072-h.htm
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#10065030 Sep 24, 2014 at 07:49 PM
9 Posts
IMAGE

link to (or better yet, embed) the resource you found: http://www.artres.com/C.aspx?VP3=ViewBox_VPage&VBID=2UN3658AFJH3A&IT=ZoomImageTemplate01_VForm&IID=2UNTWAGT4W0M&PN=11&CT=Search&SF=0

list the learning objective of the lesson the resource supports:
Review the Hudson River School of paintings
Consider how Thomas Cole's painting reflects the role of providence in colonization
Discuss recurring themes in early American art and literature

provide some form of attribution/citation of the resources:
Cole, Thomas. The Pilgrim of the Cross at the End of His Journey. 1846-1848. Painting. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Art Resource. Web. 24 Sep. 2014. http://www.artres.com/C.aspx?VP3=ViewBox_VPage&VBID=2UN3658AFJH3A&IT=ZoomImageTemplate01_VForm&IID=2UNTWAGT4W0M&PN=11&CT=Search&SF=0
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#10086331 Sep 29, 2014 at 08:40 PM
3 Posts
WRITTEN/ALPHABETIC TEXT

In my travel literature class, my students always have to do a "background check" on the author of each new book we read. In the Internet Public Library, I found a great collection of Walt Whitman information.
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#10094960 Oct 01, 2014 at 06:57 PM
9 Posts
VIDEO

list the learning objective of the lesson the resource supports:
Understand the concept of Web 2.0
Discuss how technology is changing education
Consider how weblinks sidestep the traditional hierarchical organization of content

Wesch, Michael. "Rethinking Education." Youtube.:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Xb5spS8pmE
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#10123375 Oct 08, 2014 at 01:06 PM
9 Posts
Image


I found this image through Wikipedia Commons. I could use the image in a lesson about visual rhetoric. Students could analyze the message and rhetorical appeals used in the image and contrast. This message with some of the texts we've read discussing the American Dream.

Bradley, D. (Painter. (2001). White Earth Ojibwe American Dream II [Painting], Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:American_Dream_II.jpg
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#10150206 Oct 14, 2014 at 04:25 PM
6 Posts
IMAGE:

Embed link: <iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/penmachine/3103757730/player/" width="75" height="75" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>



Miller, Derek K. "Vignette Sample -- DX Crop-Frame Lens on Full-Frame Camera." Flickr. 12 Dec. 2008.

Learning objectives for image use:

1. Exploring blog writing & digital spaces to help students think about the rhetorical considerations involved in writing online.

2. Practice rhetorical reading of place / space in terms of purpose, audience, affordances.

3. Goal: to find an image that suggests a lens or filter as a metaphor for looking at ways the tech shapes our writing. I hoped to find an images that makes the lens itself visible, like a frame, to draw attention to how we need to be conscious that we are working in an environment that shapes and/or limits what we see or communicate.

I used Google image advanced search, limiting my image by file type (jpg for faster downloading) and by open source that can be modified.
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#10170901 Oct 19, 2014 at 01:36 PM
9 Posts
Audio
Beethoven's Symphony No. 9
Audio from Ilham EternaLzboyz, Symphony Remix, Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 (Scherzo), from soundcloud.com

In "A Clockwork Orange" by Anthony Burgess, it is a recurring discussion that the main character, Alex, loves Beethoven, especially Symphony No 9. I would play this audio in the background of a lesson so that students could get the feel of the mood of this piece.

Searching for this piece in an openly licensed version was a NIGHTMARE! I can see why so many people default to just using google. Also, I was unable to embed the piece here.
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#10179566 Oct 21, 2014 at 12:10 PM
7 Posts
Written/Alphabetic Text:

How to get students to create a podcast: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k1967&pageid=icb.page23750

Lesson objective: get students familiar with different forms of new media composing. In this case, how to create a podcast episode.
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#10179727 Oct 21, 2014 at 12:42 PM
7 Posts
Image: https://www.flickr.com/photos/47637743@N00/2362013653/

Found this image using compfight.

Lesson objective: Visual rhetoric. How one can create an argument using imagery- war propaganda is a pretty good example to start with because you can generally tell that the message is very negative.
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#10179922 Oct 21, 2014 at 01:16 PM
7 Posts
VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSYw502dJNY&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtOeEc9ME62zTfqc0h6Pe8vb

Lesson objective: Introduce students to the importance of reading.

CrashCourse. (2012, November 12). How and Why we Read: Crash Course on English Literature #1
[Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSYw502dJNY&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtOeEc9ME62zTfqc0h6Pe8vb&index=1
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#10179971 Oct 21, 2014 at 01:30 PM
6 Posts
WRITTEN/ALPHABETIC TEXT
Using several quests, the emphasis on OER gives me lots of ideas for my student activities for lessons in which 21st c literacy is the intended set of outcomes.

For example, in the alphabetic text quest, I selected the Internet archive (https://archive.org/) as a possible text search portal that might be used on ENGL 1020. Asking students to add to their evaluation tool kits sites like the Way Back Machine to see what happens to a web text over time can – I imagine – produce interesting discussion of the volatility or evolution of sites students choose for research conversation partners.

Interesting as well are the tabbed options like TV news. I searched for “social media risks” here (which is something a few of my students are researching), and found several interesting – and several irrelevant – resources. Not only would a site like this advance student research possibilities, but it also allows for some critical engagement in the search engine as well. https://archive.org/details/tv?q=social%20media%20risks

Also of interest is the https://blog.archive.org associated with archive. Political ads featured! :D

Internet Archive. Brewster Kahle, Founder and Digital Librarian. 10 Mar. 2001. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
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#10180053 Oct 21, 2014 at 01:50 PM
6 Posts
VIDEO

2nd Quest: Finding Videos
This was particularly interesting as it made me think about the youtube or vimeo or TED.com videos I routinely post in my class blog for my Composition courses. This subject has also become problematic in recent attempts to integrate ipads into a writing classroom as Flash isn’t available. But I’m starting to better understand why to make the choice between embedding and linking web sources. I’ve certainly run into problems with video access at high schools, so the SchoolTube, TeacherTube, and Vimeo options were welcome.

The tips on time limits wasn’t surprising – and made me think of how a wise person once told me to divide up a 75 minute class into 15 or 20 minute chunks to maintain student engagement.

Since I’m currently working on finding an interesting and interactive activity for teaching citation, I looked for a video repository that might offer material. I liked the link for “finding video for teaching,” but haven’t plumbed the depth of that one yet. Kahn academy is a well known fav, but – like Vimeo – I have to create an account. Not a biggie, but it is a work stoppage. My favorite so far is also the Movie Clip site (http://movieclips.com/) -- over 2000 clips for “argue” including the Joker AND a great scene from Princess Bride.

For this, I chose the “Critical Past” link as I could imagine students using this to add multimedia to a research topic requiring references to background or historical events. The contents are more limited the more modern, but even this might help students think about what they’re searching for and why, making observations about historical trends.
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#10231046 Nov 02, 2014 at 12:02 PM
3 Posts
Image for Rhetorical Analysis activity.


Sony Xperia: Underwater selfie, 1

Advertising Agency: Fitzco, Atlanta, USA
Creative Directors: Ryan Boblett, Brad Harvy
Art Director: Ryan Boblett
Copywriter: Matt Shoemake
Photographer: Bil Zelman
Published: October 2014
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#10245655 Nov 05, 2014 at 01:15 PM
9 Posts
Alphabetic Text

Benjamin Franklin's Way to Wealth

This resource is great because it not only provides a free version of the text, but there are also images in the text. I think that this text than could support not only my course theme of the American Dream, but could also support my objective of cultivating visual literacy and using images/visuals to support learning and understanding. I would ask students to connect the images to an aphorism from the text, and then also ask them to find a modern day image that also corresponds to that aphorism.
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#10245676 Nov 05, 2014 at 01:19 PM
9 Posts
#10245655 Kim Fahle wrote:

Alphabetic Text

Benjamin Franklin's Way to Wealth

This resource is great because it not only provides a free version of the text, but there are also images in the text. I think that this text than could support not only my course theme of the American Dream, but could also support my objective of cultivating visual literacy and using images/visuals to support learning and understanding. I would ask students to connect the images to an aphorism from the text, and then also ask them to find a modern day image that also corresponds to that aphorism.



I forgot to provide an attribution:
Franklin, B. (1810). The way to wealth. Retrieved from http://www.gutenberg.org/files/43855/43855-h/43855-h.htm
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