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#8905081 Jan 01, 2014 at 11:52 AM
Guild Officers
108 Posts
After you've played through the map, or most of it, respond to the following questions in the guild forum thread linked below:

What was the name of the map you tested and who designed it?
What unique features, challenges, and/or puzzles did it have?

Golyn, 80 Norn Elementalist, GuildWars2
Edurealms, Minecraft
Founder WoWinSchool and MinecraftinSchool Projects
Edurealms.com
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#8908892 Jan 02, 2014 at 01:58 PM
44 Posts
After looking through the selection, I picked 'Pillars,' created by OneBadC4T. I played for about an hour, and gained some experience, but did not find a solution. Every time I built up a decent inventory, I got killed and lost everything. I enjoyed this map and will return to it when I have more time.
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#8909779 Jan 02, 2014 at 07:02 PM
21 Posts
I did amidst the clouds by mxcop13
It is laid out something like an MMORPG with different regions and quests. I did not complete the first quest, but did find part of it. I think that this would be the type of adventure I might want to develop for a project for my students, or have them develop.
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#8910903 Jan 03, 2014 at 05:39 AM
110 Posts
I downloaded two different packages - a puzzle map and an adventure map.
The puzzle map was Puzzle Castle by emeraldfyr3
This game reminded me very much of the Mayan Temple Map in that if you didn't solve the puzzles exactly right you did not have the resources needed to continue. This is not something I want to teach my students as it does not allow for unique solutions to problems.

The second map I tried was The Tourist by stratocrafteur.
The builds on this map really were impressive. The exploration of the map was really gently guided by written clues on the many signs scattered arond the build and the cleverly positioned fences which all added to the look of the build and did not detract from it. The story orientation was told within the first few minutes - the only issue I had was the brightness was too low and I had to change it to see the signs properly. Methodically exploring the streets of Paris allowed me to find supplies and head to Sacre Coeur - a wonderful replica of the church. One of the puzzles I have really enjoyed so far was finding the correct tune on the organ to light the candles and be given a key to the next part of the puzzle. It is not boring searching the map for the next place in which puzzles will be found and it is not frustrating to have to locate resources needed when the scenery is well presented and you can take your time.

In developing something with my computer club students during the year I would be encouraging them along similar lines. Tell a story in short bursts and develop key links to continue the story - set it within a specific scenario which they would have the choice of creating. I would also specify the audience for whom they will be developing the scenarios.

For my own project I think that I will try and do something similar to share with them as an example. Now to narrow down a scenario! That will be my main issue over the next few days!
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#8924827 Jan 06, 2014 at 05:04 PM
15 Posts
I downloaded and played the D.I.T.A. Laboratories map by AirsoftRules. This map took the participant through a number of 'tests', including the challenge of darkness (I got stuck and had to reload), the challenges of might (I got slaughtered), of flight (looked more like parkour to me - so I backed out) and of knowledge. What I liked was that you could pick your challenges. I could see the challenge of knowledge as a great quest you could design for any subject area. You were faced with two doorways each time and picked the doorway with the answer that you thought was correct. Consequences for picking the wrong one. You progressed through the maze with the right answer.
[^+^] :P
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#8941249 Jan 10, 2014 at 01:01 PM
Guild Officers
164 Posts
I took a stab at "The Mysterious Library" by intelligic. It was beautifully designed and it was fun to just wander around without an agenda. Of course, that was after I got out of the sewer maze of which I haven't a clue how I got there. I did resort to looking at a couple walk-throughs in my attempt to get out of the sewers. One thing that is starting to intrigue me is switches and levers. I would like to attempt a few rudimentary ones if I can. Of course you know where that will take me?! Time for a few YouTube tutorials:)
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#8942274 Jan 10, 2014 at 05:33 PM
110 Posts
#8941249 Kimmy Francois wrote:

I took a stab at "The Mysterious Library" by intelligic. It was beautifully designed and it was fun to just wander around without an agenda. Of course, that was after I got out of the sewer maze of which I haven't a clue how I got there. I did resort to looking at a couple walk-throughs in my attempt to get out of the sewers. One thing that is starting to intrigue me is switches and levers. I would like to attempt a few rudimentary ones if I can. Of course you know where that will take me?! Time for a few YouTube tutorials:)


Yes I have to agree with you there Kim. I'm at that stage too!
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#8950806 Jan 12, 2014 at 08:01 PM
7 Posts

Hi all!

I played through "Half Minute Adventure" designed by Golling. It's a fun little map! The whole thing is about 10 blocks wide. It all takes place with your character running on a one-block path by all kinds of little signs and pumpkin people. You find a pumpkin mother saying her baby has been taken.

You run into a dark NOISY cave, looking for the baby. Personally, I never found the baby. I died around 9 times, but this map has scripting so you respawn with everything in your inventory back at the beginning house ("some guy's house").

The challenge is to get through the cave alive and, I guess, find the baby. If it were up to me, that baby will be raised by Enderman and Creepers, as that's all I found in there!

I loved the enforced constraint of the map being so narrow. Very creative and flexible.

-Kate
Wit is educated insolence.
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#8961817 Jan 15, 2014 at 03:15 AM
15 Posts
I played The City of Testifica 2 by Cameron_M. One of the main reasons I chose this one (and one of the most unique features) was because it supports more players and has a class system. I was curious to see how that worked in Minecraft. The map had 13 different classes with different abilities and gear. I did know how all the components worked or how to make gear like that, so I enjoyed playing as within the classes and learning about Minecraft a bit more.

Though I have only played through the introduction, I have already explored an extensive town with a wealth of homes, merchants, and the basic tutorials. The main point of the introduction area is to familiarize players with the story and get them accustomed to the world. The map led me through parts of town to my home. It also had a guided tutorial for each class. There's a lot to do and see in the world with a lot of variety. Another unique aspect is the care given to acclimate players to the world. The tutorial has class challenges that displayed the strengths and weaknesses of individual classes before the player had to choose. This really helped me choose how I wanted to play the game. Lots of signs and information help players know where to go.

In terms of challenges, the tutorial with each class was pretty difficult. For the engineer, I had to set up a trap using redstone and other components, but I really couldn't understand how it was supposed to work. I tried many different combinations but never succeed. Thankfully, he had a skip lever for that one. When I played as an enchantress, I used teleportation orbs to move across the map. While not too hard, it did take time to get accustomed to. There are generally a lot of traps everywhere and dispensers just waiting to be triggered. In the game now, I'm at a jump puzzle over lava.
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#8962060 Jan 15, 2014 at 04:58 AM
Guild Officers
108 Posts
#8961817 psymist wrote:

I played The City of Testifica 2 by Cameron_M. One of the main reasons I chose this one (and one of the most unique features) was because it supports more players and has a class system. I was curious to see how that worked in Minecraft. The map had 13 different classes with different abilities and gear. I did know how all the components worked or how to make gear like that, so I enjoyed playing as within the classes and learning about Minecraft a bit more.

Though I have only played through the introduction, I have already explored an extensive town with a wealth of homes, merchants, and the basic tutorials. The main point of the introduction area is to familiarize players with the story and get them accustomed to the world. The map led me through parts of town to my home. It also had a guided tutorial for each class. There's a lot to do and see in the world with a lot of variety. Another unique aspect is the care given to acclimate players to the world. The tutorial has class challenges that displayed the strengths and weaknesses of individual classes before the player had to choose. This really helped me choose how I wanted to play the game. Lots of signs and information help players know where to go.

In terms of challenges, the tutorial with each class was pretty difficult. For the engineer, I had to set up a trap using redstone and other components, but I really couldn't understand how it was supposed to work. I tried many different combinations but never succeed. Thankfully, he had a skip lever for that one. When I played as an enchantress, I used teleportation orbs to move across the map. While not too hard, it did take time to get accustomed to. There are generally a lot of traps everywhere and dispensers just waiting to be triggered. In the game now, I'm at a jump puzzle over lava.



This sounds incredible. I'd be interested to know how they implemented some of these game elements.

-Lucas

Golyn, 80 Norn Elementalist, GuildWars2
Edurealms, Minecraft
Founder WoWinSchool and MinecraftinSchool Projects
Edurealms.com
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#8963595 Jan 15, 2014 at 11:11 AM
25 Posts
I tried out The Mysterious Library by Intelligic.

I am a school librarian and my main reason for trying this map was for research purposes, to be honest. I loved the open-plan wandering nature of the map where I could explore and figure out how to get around. I must admit that I was stumped a few times and resorted to YouTube tutorials a couple of times. I think somebody else mentioned in the thread that they liked the levers in this map. I agree. It seems to be a great feature to force a certain chain of events or thought processes.

Back to my initial attraction to this map... I wanted to see what the creator had done to develop their library because I have the idea that I could replicate my own library and use it as an orientation tool when new students come to our building. I am not sure of the backside logistics of making this happen, but I am going to use this idea as a means to learn more about the intricacies of creation in Minecraft.

Any tips greatly appreciated!!

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#8971029 Jan 17, 2014 at 01:20 AM · Edited over 6 years ago
5 Posts
My choice of Minecraft Adventure Games was Search for the Skyheart by Versepelles. One of the things that stood out for me about this game was how beautiful the environment is. The game is made up of a range of floating islands that eventually you can explore in a flying ship. I only played the game for about 3 hours, but couldn't figure out how to find the island where the flying craft was located. The floating islands are rocky and covered with abundant plant life (inspired by the floating islands in Avatar, no doubt). Embedded on each of the islands are a variety of platforms and cabins that you must locate and enter in order to obtain useful inventory items - which consist of story elements, food, weapons, gold, and keys. One of the main challenges is to figure out pathways through the rocky outcrops and foliage to gain access to the inventories. At night, this becomes almost impossible. One false step into the darkness and you fall a long way down to your death as you watch your health hearts disappear one after the other. Forturnately, you can quickly respawn and regain your inventory.

Some of the cabins can't be opened for inventory stashes until you complete a variety of puzzles. One central game mechanic involved following a series of blinking posts from one point to another within a 45 second time limit. This involved running up and down rocky hills, through shrubs, along prearious ledges to a inventory destination before the access door shut. It turned out, I needed to practice the 45 second obstacle course several times before I could beat it. While this was somewhat frustrating to figure out at first, later I realized this was an interesting puzzle approach that I'd never seen before. Another version of this was a run through a zombie infested dungeon. It was here where I met my untimely death several times. My inventory of stone and wood swords was no match for the persistent zombie attackers. One frustrating aspect of this game were the night time sequences, which left you fumbling around in the darkness, hoping you wouldn't plunge to your death.

I'm quite amazed at how beautiful this game world is based on the limited voxel based Minecraft platform The fact that you can build an engaging game experience in this space is also amazing to me - especially since the developers aren't professional game designers - I expect many of them are still teenagers, just getting started.

This game begins with a scene where you're immersed in a raging fire at night - it's very dramatic, and an effective way to get you engaged with the game. Here's a brief YouTube video showing that first landing point:
http://youtu.be/-_uAiVyVr0U

YouTube Link

Also, here are a few screenshots to show you what the Skyheart world looks like.

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#8971816 Jan 17, 2014 at 06:47 AM
Guild Officers
108 Posts
So awesome... The amount of time invested... wow...

Golyn, 80 Norn Elementalist, GuildWars2
Edurealms, Minecraft
Founder WoWinSchool and MinecraftinSchool Projects
Edurealms.com
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#9008673 Jan 25, 2014 at 12:49 PM
17 Posts
I played Professor Grizwald and the Curse of the Pyramid. It was created by ChronoBlaster and I really enjoyed it. It was a good challenge for me as a beginner and I got half way through before stopping. I liked that I had to explore a lot and follow clues. The clues were provided as text files and I wonder why the creator didn't add those as signs or books, perhaps it might have to do with the fact that it was done in version 1.1.
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